ArtsATL > Art+Design > TIME RUNNING OUT: Order tickets for martinis and Jazz Age design on September 30

TIME RUNNING OUT: Order tickets for martinis and Jazz Age design on September 30

This 20s Dunhill lighter is  among 4,000 belonging to our mystery collector, who has opened his home for ArtsATL's cocktail party.
These Dunhill lighters are among 4,000 belonging to our mystery collector, who will open his home for ArtsATL’s cocktail party on September 30.

 

A fun way to support ArtsATL and the arts coverage you enjoy. Space is limited. To purchase, click here or mail checks to ArtsATL.com, P.O. Box 8983, Atlanta, GA 31106.

The back story:

There are as many stories about collections as there are collectors. This one began with jet lag.

An Atlantan doing business in Europe would arrive early and walk off the transatlantic time warp by strolling through weekend flea markets. Aiming to make these walks more purposeful, he decided to look for something. He found just the target in vintage cigarette lighters: portable, available — and beautiful.

Back when everybody smoked, lighters were fashion statements, like watches. Designers went to town creating palm-sized works of art. They might bear Japanese imagery in lacquer or sport pizazzy Deco patterns. A number resemble classical architecture. Some are embedded with watches. Others are encrusted with jewels.

The aerodynamic shape of this martini shaker was typical of Jazz Age design.
The aerodynamic shape of this martini shaker was typical of Jazz Age design.

Our mystery Atlantan eventually amassed 4,000 lighters. But you know how collectors are: they can’t stop. He also acquired a cache of American Deco Bakelite radios and period martini shakers, and he and his wife furnished their elegant home with period French Art Deco pieces.

The couple has graciously agreed to host a cocktail party at their home on behalf of ArtsATL. We invite you to join us for A Vintage Evening on Tuesday, September 30 from 7 to 9 p.m. We will be serving up drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and a chance to meet the collector and to enjoy these unusual collections of furniture and objects. Really, now, could there be a better place to enjoy a martini?

Ticket holders will receive notice of the location shortly before the event.

Bakelite, a plastic  resin,was commonly used for radio cabinets n the 30s and 40s because it wouldn't burn up if the tubes inside it exploded. Nifty-looikng, too.
Bakelite, a plastic resin, was commonly used for radio cabinets in the 1930s and ’40s because it wouldn’t catch fire if the tubes inside it exploded. Nifty-looking, too.

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